Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Renew Economy claims my native Australia, at 1.4C warming above pre-industrial, stands on the brink of the dreaded 1.5C threshold. My question, when should we expect to see something unusually bad happen?

Scientists issue desperate climate warning: Australia already at 1.4°C

Michael Mazengarb 9 August 2021

Scientists have delivered a stark warning to the world about the impacts of climate change, saying that extreme heat, flooding, and drought are being observed in every region of the world and that these will increase in their intensity extreme unless rapid action is taken to reduce emissions.

The report – the first of its kind in eight years – “unequivocally” confirms that global warming is occurring, attributed to human-caused increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases.

The shocking news for Australia – already criticised for doing little on climate change – is that average temperatures have already risen 1.4°C.

The authors say that the current and future impacts of global warming are now well understood with unprecedented levels of certainty thanks to improved climate observations and advances in the scientific understanding of the human influence on the world’s climate.

“This report is a reality check,” IPCC Working Group I co-chair Valérie Masson-Delmotte said. “We now have a much clearer picture of the past, present and future climate, which is essential for understanding where we are headed, what can be done, and how we can prepare.”

Read more: https://reneweconomy.com.au/scientists-issue-desperate-climate-warning-australia-already-at-1-4c/

Climate alarmists are taking a big narrative risk by bringing us to the brink of the magic threshold. Author Stephen King once offered the following advice for fiction writers in his story and essay collection Danse Macabre – advice which I believe climate alarmists will soon regret not heeding;

What’s behind the door or lurking at the top of the stairs is never as frightening as the door or the staircase itself. And because of this, comes the paradox: the artistic work of horror is almost always a disappointment. It is the classic no-win situation. You can scare people with the unknown for a long, long time (the classic example, as Bill Nolan also pointed out, is the Jacques Tourneur film with Dana Andrews, Curse of the Demon but sooner or later, as in poker, you have to turn your down cards up. You have to open the door and show the audience what’s behind it. And if what happens to be behind it is a bug, not ten but a hundred feet tall, the audience heaves a sigh of relief (or utters a scream of relief) and thinks, “A bug a hundred feet tall is pretty horrible, but I can deal with that. I was afraid it might be a thousand feet tall”….

Sooner or later the hero has to reach the top of the staircase, and face the monster. 1.4C warming must become 1.5C warming, tipping points have to tip.

And when nothing much happens, when life goes on as normal, what then?

How will alarmists deal with the narrative plot dead end they have created for themselves?

Stephen King himself sadly appears to have fallen for climate alarmist narratives. But who knows, perhaps in time the great author will will recognise the climate crisis for what it is – amateurish, poorly written horror fiction.

via Watts Up With That?

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August 10, 2021