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By Paul Homewood

A little bit more detail to add to the post I did on Norway’s power consumption last week:

http://energodock.com/norway/electricity-generation

As the charts above show, generation runs at around 15 GW in summer, but rises to 25 GW in winter. Nearly all of Norway’s power comes from hydro. Demand in summer tends to be lower than generation, but in winter surpluses are smaller:

Norway’s electricity consumption is much greater than the UK’s on a per capita basis – 25 MWh v 5 MWh. The main reason is that Norway uses very little gas, either domestically or industrially:

BP Energy Review 2019

Instead they are mainly reliant on electricity for heating. A 2012 study by Norway Statistics found that average household electricity consumption was 15977 KWh, roughly equivalent to the combined electricity. gas consumption of a UK home:

https://www.ssb.no/en/energi-og-industri/statistikker/husenergi/hvert-3-aar/2014-07-14

In 2012, 44% of all detached homes had heat pumps. They also commented:

It is no surprise then to see why electricity consumption is so high in Norway. In 2019, for instance, generation amounted to 134 Twh for a population of 5 million, compared to 323 TWh in the UK with a population of 67 million.

This ultra reliance on electrical heating gives an insight into the increase in generating capacity the UK will need, if it follows Norway’s path.

Given that we have a population 12 times the size. where Norway’s demand peaks at 25 GW, ours is likely to hot 300 GW.

It is worth pointing out, by the way, that Norway’s conversion to electric cars has barely got going yet, with EVs only accounting for about 10% of cars on the road. When all cars are electric, this will inevitable put more pressure on the grid.

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February 8, 2021 at 08:27AM