EU’s stricter CO2 targets “impossible”, say automakers

Fireworks illuminate the sky around a huge euro sculpture, designed by German artist Ottmar Hoerl, in front of the headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt, January 1, 2002. Several thousand people in Frankfurt celebrated at a party on the streets around the ECB to welcome Europe’s new currency, the euro. UNICS REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach REUTERS KP – RTRBPKK

The EU pushes ever further into its climate fantasy land, where so-called targets can be raised at will and the victims of them miraculously obey, regardless of any real world obstacles like actually selling cars. It prefers noises made by teenage ‘activists’ to anything said by the wealth-creating vehicle makers. The bill for this insanity is now expected to top a trillion euros every three years. Where are such gigantic sums supposed to come from?
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The EU’s target to reduce its industrial emissions by 2030 should increase from 40% to “at least 55%”, European Commission (EC) president Ursula von der Leyen said in her State of the Union address.

That would seriously burden Europe’s auto industry, says Fleet Europe.

The cause of decarbonisation is better served by better policies rather than stricter targets, ACEA counters.

In March, the EC proposed a European Climate Law, which would make the goal of climate neutrality by 2050 legally binding, and which would include a more ambitious emissions reduction plan than the present one.

€350 billion

Von der Leyen’s proposal to increase the target from 40% to 55% certainly is ambitious. The extra effort requires an additional investment of €350 billion per year.

A part of that amount will go towards accelerating the development of cleaner cars and more sustainable energy generation (solar, wind and hydrogen).

But as yet, her proposal is just that – a proposal. The new 2030 targets will eventually be decided in a ‘trialogue’ between the EC, the member states and the European Parliament (EP).

By the way, the EP’s Environment committee previously advocated a 60% reduction by 2030.

The EC’s stricter emissions targets would have specific consequences for the automotive industry. They imply that average CO2 emissions of new cars in 2030 should be 50% below 2021 levels. The current target calls for a 37.5% reduction.

Full article here.

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September 19, 2020 at 12:06PM

Author: uwe.roland.gross

Don`t worry there is no significant man- made global warming. The global warming scare is not driven by science but driven by politics. Al Gore and the UN are dead wrong on climate fears. The IPCC process is a perversion of science.